Arkisto: June 2014



Dear Gigantti.fi

18. Juneta, 2014 | Kirjoittaja: Antti Niittyviita

Our reader approached us with a piece of customer feedback that had been sent via one of the web shops. The ending words brightened my day to such a degree that I promised to publish the entire piece. :D

To Whom It May Concern,

Dear Gigantti.fi

I have tried now twice to order a product from you web shop (gigantti.fi). Unfortunately, it seems to be impossible.  But maybe you have already too much sales and money and are not interested for further sales?

First time i run into problem with ”Virhe toimitustavan valinnassa”. I even contacted your facebook contact page with problem, but unfortunate there was no response.

Second time i was told that my ”Email is already registered”. Ok, i then tried to login with google login. But it said that ”Session Expired”. I did not know what to do….

Maybe i am too stupid to use your system. But on the other hand, i think i am not alone. There may be many customers who would like to give you more money, but they are not smart enough to find a way…. ;)

But seriously, if you want to make your web site work and add to sales, please consider using professional software testing services! I can recommend one right away: www.prove.fi.

Thank you for the words of confidence dear reader :) If they approach us because of this feedback, I will personally walk to Gigantti and buy you that item you were looking for. Then, send it to you!

Do you want to spare money in handling consumer-customer feedback? Make sure that your system does not ruin business and give room for complaints.

Never Crossed Our Minds

5. Juneta, 2014 | Kirjoittaja: Antti Niittyviita

One cannot find a situation so simple that it could not be botched. A tiny human error can cause a large problem.

Last time this happened in Helsinki University’s geopolitical research entrance exam. The exam book was changed from the previous year, but the entrance exam was made according to the information in the older book. In order for this to be possible, the following must hold true:

  • No one told the exam maker of the change
  • The exam maker did not check what literature is tested in the entrance exam
  • The entrance exam committee (or whatever the entity is that organized the entrance exam) did not check that the exam and the requirements matched each other.

The first people to notice the mistake was the exam takers. The exam was cancelled, and a new time for the exam had to be organized. It must have not been simple to try and get 180 people to a new exam in a way that offended no one’s rights. Now there is talk that the university should reimburse the travel expenses caused to the exam takers from the new exam. A complete mess and right before the summer holidays.

There is no error so stupid that it cannot be made. Estimate your testing- and checking practices according to potential risks caused by a flaw.

Michelin Chef’s ABC

4. Juneta, 2014 | Kirjoittaja: Antti Niittyviita

I occasionally dine out. I am an entrepreneur, so I visit high-class places only when someone else is paying. The previous time a miracle such as that happened was in spring 2012, I think, when we enjoyed a five-course meal in restaurant Olo in Helsinki in well-to-do company.

The food was excellent. Olo was not voted the restaurant of the year for no reason. The servings looked wonderful and the story behind them when they were served was fascinating. After that evening, I could not help but wonder.

What separates ordinary chefs from these Michelin starred artists?

I came to a conclusion that all chefs know how to prepare food. Steaks are cooked with skill, and flambéing goes smoothly. The separating factor must therefore be somewhere else.

Most professionals, regardless of their field, are quite talented in what they do. Testers in testing and chefs in making food. The B-part, the execution, is usually the easiest part of the work. The separating factor between the gurus and the laymen must therefore be found elsewhere.

The most famous chefs are careful in the preparation, or the A-part. They know beforehand with precision, how the cooking is done and use the working methods chosen with certainty by themselves. They choose the raw materials with care and spend time for the preparation.

The popularity of a restaurant or the fame of a master chef, however, is only born in the end. The C-part is presentation. The serving is arranged with pin-point precision for the customer. It looks beautiful and the flavors are in balance. The master chef takes a taste at each part of the work to ensure the outcome. Finally, the waiter presents the serving including the story behind it.

Gastronomy is a somewhat older form of art than testing. Should you wish to become a Michelin master of testing, you have to start today.

Acquire a new idea each day to support your preparation or presentation. Be patient and practice!